Over The Moon’s crew has a Jester to keep it entertained and spirits up when working the long summer days.  The Jester provided a lovely tent related joke for us this week.

A man pays a visit to his doctor and tells him,

“On Monday night I dreamt I was a Tipi, and then on tuesday night I dreamt I was a Yurt.” 

“Hmm”, said the doctor pondering the meaning of these dreams. Then he exclaimed, ” Don’t worry, you are just Too Tense”.

 

The Jester strikes the funny bone again

The Jester strikes the funny bone again

We headed right into the heart of the nation’s capital with a tipi on Monday. The mission was to put up a tipi for a fashion shoot for the Times newspaper’s Saturday 18 April 2009 supplement.  In 35mph gusts we had our work cut out but we managed it and they got their shots.  Keep an eye out for the pics in the supplement.

Crikey.. the tipi braves the traffic by the Tower of London

Crikey.. the tipi braves the traffic by the Tower of London

Tipi Fashion Shoot

Tipi Fashion Shoot

We’ve been doing more research on designs for painting some of our tipi canvas’s.  This site was recommended by Johnny Morris of Wolf Glen Tipis when we visited his evocative and inspiring tipi and home in Galashiels.  Here’s an exerpt from the site’s page on painted tipis.

http://www.tipis-tepees-teepees.com/tipi_gallery.php?i=

Canvas, linen or cloth covers for tipis started becoming popular among the Native Americans around 1851.  According to Kurz’s  1851 journal, more of the wealthy men were already getting canvas for their lodges.  Treaty annuity payments in the late 1850s and 1860s, also were accompanied by lots of canvas bed ticking an other fabrics.  As the 19th. century wore on, the covers got bigger.  More bolder surface designs were applied with the new industrial paints and dyes that did not wash off or fade.  Looking at old photos of Blackfoot tipis, drawings of the Kiowa, Cheyenne, and Sioux depicts spectacular cover paintings in their sketch books.